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360 degree feedback, organizational trust, change & sustainability
What are your people worth - familiar?
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Wednesday, 15 August 2007
Salary surveys are often promoted with the "What are your people worth?" tag. Such surveys may have their value but, seriously, do you think that the kind of loyalty and contribution that you need in your enterprise can really be obtained from a price tag? Consider these myths that some organizations still live by:
  • "you pay work by the day, week, month..."
  • "you're paid to do this job, aren't you?"
  • "you can be replaced"
and a lot more. The point is this: yes, there is a minimum requirement you can specify that someone has to do to fill a job, and that may include showing up on time. But what do you do while you're there? The essence of today's organization is that you, a staff member:
  • want to be there - feel good, contribute to overall morale
  • are allowed to contribute your ideas and get credit for them
  • feel loyal to the organization and want the best for it
  • can complain and get heard
  • are willing to do what you can to meet deadlines and emergencies or deal with difficult customers - and get rewarded for it.
So think of someone who is all of that - and how much are they worth? It won't be a price tag on the shelf. They might want more, or they might do it willingly for less - if they like the job.

If you are starting with 'ordinary' people, how can you transform them into loyal contributors? Or if you are clever enough to hire such people, how do you maintain their goodwill?

You can certainly do this by implementing a program of 360 Facilitated. This kind of culture is what it is designed to achieve. No wonder we have been told time after time "Your 360 is unique, unlike anything else that's available". It gets results.
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posted by Dr Ron @ 11:48  
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